Soy Tuna Steaks and Macedonian Salad.
I have a new sous chef on the scene. Welcommmmmmmeeee E-Mannnnnnnnn!
Considering I’m a vegetarian and E-Man is most certainly not, I try to compromise somewhere in the middle. And I’m not complaining, anything with the word “steak” in it is A-OK in my book.
This is, basically, a huge tuna steak covered in minced garlic, ginger, and cilantro, sauteed in soy sauce and topped with feta cheese. The soy sauce scared me at first—in my almost-failed attempt at reducing, I was met with sizzles of hell as black dots stained my pristinely clean (*cough*) stovetop. It thickened until it somehow burned, which I did not realize you could do to a liquid, so I started over. $11.99 a pound tuna steaks were not about to get covered in science-defying burnt soy sauce.
So, I managed to time it just right and stuck the steak in the pan just as it began to reduce, and let it simmer there for a few minutes on each side. Then on went the feta, letting it melt a bit before I plated that sucker with some of Moosewood’s Macedonian Salad I’d prepared and let marinate for a while. Let’s just say I’m a good girlfriend sometimes.  

Soy Tuna Steaks and Macedonian Salad.

I have a new sous chef on the scene. Welcommmmmmmeeee E-Mannnnnnnnn!

Considering I’m a vegetarian and E-Man is most certainly not, I try to compromise somewhere in the middle. And I’m not complaining, anything with the word “steak” in it is A-OK in my book.

This is, basically, a huge tuna steak covered in minced garlic, ginger, and cilantro, sauteed in soy sauce and topped with feta cheese. The soy sauce scared me at first—in my almost-failed attempt at reducing, I was met with sizzles of hell as black dots stained my pristinely clean (*cough*) stovetop. It thickened until it somehow burned, which I did not realize you could do to a liquid, so I started over. $11.99 a pound tuna steaks were not about to get covered in science-defying burnt soy sauce.

So, I managed to time it just right and stuck the steak in the pan just as it began to reduce, and let it simmer there for a few minutes on each side. Then on went the feta, letting it melt a bit before I plated that sucker with some of Moosewood’s Macedonian Salad I’d prepared and let marinate for a while. 

Let’s just say I’m a good girlfriend sometimes.  

Stuffed French Toast.
B-dawg strikes again.
We’re pleased to tell you not only did we create this recipe by ourselves, we also ate it and did not gag. The purple may throw you off, but rest assured it is only the natural byproduct of wonderfully fresh (and suicidally expensive) blueberries, peaches, and blackberries. Lemme show you how it’s done—and please remember these ingredients/instructions are a ROUGH estimation of what actually occurred in the kitchen…:
French Toast: Eggs, bread, cinnamon
Soak bread in whisked eggs and sprinkle with cinnamon. Fry until brown on both sides. You know the drill. Sauce: 1/2 cup blueberries, 1/2 cup blackberries, 1/2 cup peaches, 2 tbsp. sugar, 3/4 cup cream cheese 
Put fruit in sauce pan. Put sauce pan on stove. Put stove on medium heat. Let it get niiiiice n’ not. Sprinkle with sugar. Let sugar mix with juices. Stir and observe colorful syrup. Mix in cream cheese. Let it get niiiice n’ hot. Pour inside a sandwich of french toast. EAT.
We aren’t chefs or anything, but we know a good breakfast when we taste it.
We tasted. And it was good.

Stuffed French Toast.

B-dawg strikes again.

We’re pleased to tell you not only did we create this recipe by ourselves, we also ate it and did not gag. The purple may throw you off, but rest assured it is only the natural byproduct of wonderfully fresh (and suicidally expensive) blueberries, peaches, and blackberries. Lemme show you how it’s done—and please remember these ingredients/instructions are a ROUGH estimation of what actually occurred in the kitchen…:

French Toast: Eggs, bread, cinnamon

Soak bread in whisked eggs and sprinkle with cinnamon. Fry until brown on both sides. You know the drill. 

Sauce: 1/2 cup blueberries, 1/2 cup blackberries, 1/2 cup peaches, 2 tbsp. sugar, 3/4 cup cream cheese 

Put fruit in sauce pan. Put sauce pan on stove. Put stove on medium heat. Let it get niiiiice n’ not. Sprinkle with sugar. Let sugar mix with juices. Stir and observe colorful syrup. Mix in cream cheese. Let it get niiiice n’ hot. Pour inside a sandwich of french toast. EAT.

We aren’t chefs or anything, but we know a good breakfast when we taste it.

We tasted. And it was good.

Sweet Broiled Salmon on a Light Balsamic Slaw with Garlic Mashed Potatoes.
This, my friends, is our first homemade recipe. BOOYAH!
It was actually an accident. We intended on following a recipe but realized we had the wrong ingredients and were too hungry to wait any longer, so we put on our thinking caps and made something out of it. Voi-freakin-LA. Here’s the gist:
1 lb of salmon
1/2 lime
2 tbsp honey
1 tbsp Garlic powder
Olive oil 
Coarsely ground sea salt 
Fresh cilantro (chopped finely) 
Cover a baking sheet with aluminum foil and sprinkle olive oil. Place salmon on the oil and rub a little more on top. 
Lightly drizzle the honey on top, making sure there are no globs. Sprinkle garlic powder and cilantro evenly. Add course sea salt in moderation, for a little crunch. Lastly, squeeze lime over salmon.
Broil for about 5 minutes if you like your salmon medium rare (still a little raw inside). 6 or 7 minutes for cooked all the way through. Squeeze a little more lime on top and enjoy sweet salmony goodness.
I’d give the recipe for the slaw and potatoes, but I forgot them and they weren’t incredible enough to recreate. The good part was the salmon. The crunchy salt offset the sweetness of the honey that soaked into the skin, while the lime and cilantro were a perfectly tart combination that gave the flavor dimension. And, not to toot my own horn, but the salmon was soft and flaky, cooked reeeeeal nice. 
And we had SO MUCH FOOD it was ridiculous. When I think about it, that one plate was half a pound of salmon, a potato and a half, and 1/4 a head of cabbage…
Miller and Sanders. Encouraging American obesity one meal at a time.

Sweet Broiled Salmon on a Light Balsamic Slaw with Garlic Mashed Potatoes.

This, my friends, is our first homemade recipe. BOOYAH!

It was actually an accident. We intended on following a recipe but realized we had the wrong ingredients and were too hungry to wait any longer, so we put on our thinking caps and made something out of it. Voi-freakin-LA. Here’s the gist:

  • 1 lb of salmon
  • 1/2 lime
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 1 tbsp Garlic powder
  • Olive oil 
  • Coarsely ground sea salt 
  • Fresh cilantro (chopped finely) 
  1. Cover a baking sheet with aluminum foil and sprinkle olive oil. Place salmon on the oil and rub a little more on top. 
  2. Lightly drizzle the honey on top, making sure there are no globs. Sprinkle garlic powder and cilantro evenly. Add course sea salt in moderation, for a little crunch. Lastly, squeeze lime over salmon.
  3. Broil for about 5 minutes if you like your salmon medium rare (still a little raw inside). 6 or 7 minutes for cooked all the way through. Squeeze a little more lime on top and enjoy sweet salmony goodness.

I’d give the recipe for the slaw and potatoes, but I forgot them and they weren’t incredible enough to recreate. The good part was the salmon. The crunchy salt offset the sweetness of the honey that soaked into the skin, while the lime and cilantro were a perfectly tart combination that gave the flavor dimension. And, not to toot my own horn, but the salmon was soft and flaky, cooked reeeeeal nice. 

And we had SO MUCH FOOD it was ridiculous. When I think about it, that one plate was half a pound of salmon, a potato and a half, and 1/4 a head of cabbage…

Miller and Sanders. Encouraging American obesity one meal at a time.

Polenta Pie.

Moosewood’s back, bitches. (Sorry Mom)

Sanders and I have been getting tired of ourselves. Pasta, boxed couscous, random vegetables thrown into a pan, jarred sauces. Like, come on. We needed some inspiration. 

So, we turned to Old Faithful. Moosewood consistently provides creative, vegetable-based vegetarian food. Repetitive, you say? Nay. Vegetarian food today, as done by non-vegetarians and noobs, has essentially transformed into, “Let’s take meat out of this and replace it with something meatless.” This yields dishes like veggie burgers, tofu nuggets, and favorites like lasagna or tacos sans animal. Why? Why must a vegetarian play by a carnivore’s rules? Why can’t vegetables be the means and the end? 

This is why I love Moosewood. It turns vegetables into meals without feeling like it’s missing or replacing something. For example, the Polenta Pie. Reminiscent of pizza, the thick layer of gooey polenta (picture cornmeal grits) is covered with mozzarella, fresh tomatoes, and sauteed zucchini, onions, and spices to create a hearty, flavorful meal in and of itself. Crunchy outside, squishy inside, delicious everyside. Neither of us were thinking, “Oh, I really needed some pepperoni on this…” or “What a great substitution for ______!”

Satisfaction, is what we thought. Just…satisfaction.

Peanut Butter Cup Cake.

For the record, mini-Reese’s cups are the best invention ever. Hands down. No exceptions.

This was originally supposed to be a blondie brownie but somehow came out fluffier than expected. I can’t really say much for this recipe—it basically tasted like a light, peanut butter cake with a few Reese’s cups on top. Nothing fancy, but it hit the spot for our late-night dessert cravings. 

Das all.